6th EEASA Conference 2016 – Final Programme

logo-eeasa6th biannual conference of the European Early American Studies Association
Paris, France, December 8-10, 2016
Space, Mobility, and Power in Early America and the Atlantic World, 1650-1850

Conference Programme (click here to download as single PDF file)

The PRECIRCULATED PAPERS can be downloaded here (the page is password-protected)

Maps and directions! (PDF)

Thursday December 8, 2016
Université Paris Diderot
Halle aux farines (Hall F)
10 rue Françoise Dolto, 75013 Paris

8.30 a.m.-2.15 p.m. – Registration

9 a.m.-10.45 a.m. – First morning session

Salle des Thèses (580F)
Circulations of Transatlantic Science
Chair: Irmina Wawrzyczek, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin                                           

  • Kristen Block (The University of Tennessee-Knoxville), Water, Fluidity, and the Permeable Body: Creole Medical Dialogues in the Early Caribbean
  • Juliane Braun (Universität Bonn, Germany), Imperial circuits of scientific knowledge: Pacific Exploration, Atlantic Slavery, and the Transplantation of the Breadfruit Tree
  • Alice Marples (King’s College London), The Mobility of Scholarly, Commercial and Colonial Knowledge in Atlantic Botanical Networks

Room 574F
Empires at the margins
Chair: Andrew O’Shaughnessy, International Jefferson Studies Center, Monticello

  • James Dator (Goucher College), Imperial Indifference and Islander Culture in the Leeward Archipelago, c. 1650-1750
  • Garrett Fontenot (University of Notre Dame), French Louisiana’s 1768 Revolt Against the Spanish Empire
  • Csaba Lévai (Debrecen University), Peoples, Commodities, and Culture in Negotiations Between the United States and the Habsburg Empire in the 1780s
  • Samantha Seeley (University of Richmond), Managing Mobility and Making States in the Post-Revolutionary Northwest Territory

 10.45 a.m.- 11.15 a.m. – Coffee break

 

11.15 a.m.-1 p.m. – Second morning session

 Salle des Thèses (580F)
Circulations of racialized science
Chair: Will Slauter, Université Paris Diderot

  • Susan Branson (Syracuse University), Phrenology and the Science of Race in Early America
  • Marcel Hartwig, (Universität Siegen, Germany), A Web of Friends: Transnational Quaker Networks and the Pennsylvania Medical Library
  • Tim Lockley (University of Warwick), Medicine, Race and the recruitment of slaves to serve in the British West India Regiments in the 1790s

Room 574F
Circulations of Transatlantic religion
Chair: Susanne Lachenicht, Universität Bayreuth

  • Lucia Bergamasco (Université d’Orléans), Transatlantic Evangelical Connections during the Second Great Awakening
  • Christine Croxall (Washington University, St. Louis), Church and State Entwined in the Mississippi River Valley: Native Spaces, Catholic Missions, and the Chimera of Civilization in the Early Nineteenth Century
  • Carla Gardina Pestana (UCLA), The Early Quakers, Religious Dispersion and Managing Mobility in the 17th century Atlantic

 

1 p.m.-2.15 p.m. – Lunch (for registered participants) and Book talk

Salle des Thèses (580F)

  • Marie-Jeanne Rossignol & Bertrand Van Ruymbeke, eds., The Atlantic World of Anthony Benezet (Brill, 2016)

Room 574F

  • Trevor Burnard, The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016)

 

2.15 p.m.-4 p.m. – Afternoon session

Salle des Thèses (580F)
The economics of empire
Chair: Pierre Gervais, Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle

  • Cynthia Bouton (Texas A&M University), Flour for pesos: the geopolitics and economics of provisioning the Leclerc Expedition to suppress the Revolution in Saint Domingue, 1801-1803
  • Ben Marsh (University of Kent), ‘Un Objet Considerable’: French Silk Schemes, Models, and Problems in America, c.1680-1740
  • Simon Middleton (University of Sheffield), Geopolitics, Colonial Sovereignty, and the Circulation of Paper Money in Early-Eighteenth Century New York
  • Michael Zakim (Tel Aviv University), Importing the World’s Fair:  New York’s Crystal Palace, 1853

 Room 574F
Culture at the margins
Chair: Maurizio Valsania, Università degli studi di Torino

  • Wayne K. Bodle (Indiana University of Pennsylvania), Ohiopiomingo, A ‘Real Enough’ Settlement on the Ohio Valley Frontier in the Revolutionary Atlantic World
  • Diane Boucher (Clark University), Balancing Community, Opportunity, and Authority: Negotiating Power in Late Eighteenth-Century Colonial East Florida
  • Lorelle Semley (College of the Holy Cross), Refuge and Redemption in a Nineteenth-Century Black Bordeaux

 4 p.m.-5 p.m. – Break

The keynote lecture will be held at the Fondation des Etats-Unis, together with the reception.
N.B. Due to security reasons, no access is possible for non-registered participants at the Fondation des Etats-Unis. Badges must be worn at all times.
To allow time for traveling between the two venues, the conference schedule includes a one-hour break between the afternoon session and the plenary talk.
Cité Universitaire, Fondation des Etats-Unis, “Grand Salon”, 15 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
http://www.ciup.fr/fondation-etats-unis/

 

5 p.m.-6.15 p.m. Keynote lecture

Chair: Irmina Wawrzyczek, President of EEASA

  • Ada Ferrer, New York University: “Havana in a World of War, Revolution, and Empire.”

  

6.15 p.m.-8 p.m. – Reception

  

 

Friday December 9, 2016
Université Paris Diderot
Halle aux farines (Hall F)
10 rue Françoise Dolto, 75013 Paris

Maps and directions! (PDF)

8.30 a.m.-2.15 p.m. – Registration

9 a.m.-10.45 a.m. – First morning session

Salle des Thèses (580F)
Local politics at Empire’s margins
Chair: Lauric Henneton, Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

  • Gayle K. Brunelle (California State University, Fullerton), Parisian Knowledge versus Local Knowledge in French Guiana: The Case of the Compagnie de la Terre Ferme de l’Amérique, ou la France Equinoctialle, 1651-1655
  • Elizabeth Heijmans (Leiden University), French expansionism and Inter-Imperial Relations in the African Port City of Ouidah (Bight of Benin) during the first half of the 18th century
  • Donald Johnson (North Dakota State University), Negotiating Space and Power in North American Port Cities at the End of the Revolutionary War
  • Alexander Ponsen (University of Pennsylvania), Beyond Cores, Peripheries and Polycentricity: The Diffusion of Sovereignty in Paraguay and São Vicente, 1600-1750

Room 574 F
Circulating gender
Chair: Manuel Covo, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • Debra Burnett (University of Glasgow), The Transgressors and Tawdry: The Transportation of Women Convicts to the British Colonies During the Eighteenth Century
  • Leopold Lippert (Universität Salzburg), Transatlantic Bodies of Representation in Robert Hunter’s Androboros (1715)
  • Nancy Christie (University of Western Ontario) and Michael Gauvreau (McMaster University, Canada), Contested Spaces of Law and Economy: Gendered Power within Merchant Networks in Quebec, 1760-1820

 Room 575 F
“Race”, Revolutions, and mobility       
Chair: Claire Bourhis-Mariotti, Université Paris 8-Vincennes St Denis

  • Andy Cabot (Université Paris Diderot), « Au milieu de ces désastres dont les suites se feront sentir longtemps »: Saint-Domingue and Atlantic diplomacy, 1791-1794
  • Thierry Drapeau (University at Buffalo-SUNY), The “Western Wave” of 1848-49: Reconsidering the Underground Railroad in the Atlantic Age of Revolution
  • Anna Mae Duane (University of Connecticut), Education, Colonization, and Black Futures in the Mid-Nineteenth
  • John Pulis (Hofstra University), In the Belly of the Beast: George Liele, Moses Baker, and Black Loyalists in Jamaica

10.45 a.m.- 11.15 a.m. – Coffee break

 

11.15 a.m-1 p.m – Second morning session

Salle des Thèses (580F)
Mobile elites
Chair: Zbigniew Mazur, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin

  • Elodie Peyrol Kleiber (Université de Poitiers), An Elite Maryland Colonist, Planter, and Minister: Circulating the Pro-Slavery Gospel of Thomas Bacon
  • Valérie Capdeville (Université Paris 13), Circulating the British Club Model in the Atlantic World: Mapping Spaces and Networks of power in the Eighteenth century
  • Carolyn Eastman (Virginia Commonwealth University), The Transatlantic Celebrity of “Mr O.” Oratory and the Structures of Reputation in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain and America

Room 574 F
Commercing
Chair: Allan Potofsky, Université Paris Diderot

  • Randi Flaherty (University of Virginia School of Law), Constructing Commercial Geographies to Compete in the Atlantic World, Boston and Salem in the Eighteenth Century
  • Daniel Maudlin (University of Plymouth), The Tavern: Mobility, Built Space and Cultural Power on the Western Frontier in the Late Eighteenth-Century.
  • Julie Svalastog (Leiden University), The Merging of the British East and West India Trading Companies in the Mid-Seventeenth Century

 Room 575 F
Imperial Controls
Chair: Emma Hart, University of St Andrews

  • Elizabeth Clay (University of Pennsylvania), From Empire’s Margins: Clove and Cacao Production in French Guiana, 1802-1848
  • Justin Roberts (Dalhousie University), A Swarm of People: Population Management and Migration Strategies in Barbados, 1645-1670
  • Deborah Rosen (Lafayette College), Borders, Migrations, and Power in Southeastern North America and the Caribbean, 1700-1820
  • Winter Rae Schneider (UCLA), La Dette de l’Indépendance: Property, Indemnity and Sovereignty in Post-Revolutionary Haiti

 

1 p.m.-2.15 p.m. – Lunch (for registered participants)

  

2.15 p.m.-4 p.m. – Afternoon session

Salle des Thèses (580F)
Perceptions of the Spaces of Others
Chair: Joanne van der Woude, University of Groningen

  • Iris De Rode (Université Paris 8-Vincennes St Denis), The ‘networks of influence’ of the Marquis François Jean de Chastellux, General and Philosopher at the End of the Eighteenth Century
  • Carine Lounissi (Université de Rouen), An Empire for Liberty: Space and Republicanism in French Writings on the United States in Pre-Revolutionary France
  • Yevan Terrien (University of Pittsburgh), Runaways, Deserters, and Wood Runners: The Regulation of Spatial Mobility in French Louisiana (ca. 1700-1760)

Room  574 F
Work and empire
Chair: Owen Stanwood, Boston College

  • Anne-Claire Faucquez (Université Paris 8-Vincennes St Denis), Bound labor in colonial New York: Degrees of unfreedom in the Atlantic World
  • Allison Madar (California State University, Chico), Degrees of Unfreedom: Convict Servitude, Indentured Servitude, Slavery and the Law in Eighteenth-Century Virginia
  • Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan (Rutgers University), ‘No other claim than his poverty:’ Vagrancy, Slavery, and the Forced Transportation of Paupers in the Early Republic Mid-Atlantic

Room 575 F
Circulating the sea
Chair: Bertrand van Ruymbeke, Université Paris 8-Vincennes St Denis

  • Charles Foy (Eastern Illinois University), Mapping Liberty for Black Mariners in the Eighteenth-Century Anglo-American Atlantic
  • Chris Hodson (Brigham Young University), Rumford’s Progress: Nutrition and Power in the Revolutionary Atlantic
  • Julia Mansfield (Stanford), Antidote to Revolution: the Work of Quarantine in the Early United States

 

4 p.m.-5 p.m. – Break

The keynote lecture will be held at the Fondation des Etats-Unis, together with the reception.
N.B. Due to security reasons, no access is possible for non-registered participants at the Fondation des Etats-Unis. Badges must be worn at all times.
To allow time for traveling between the two venues, the conference schedule includes a one-hour break between the afternoon session and the plenary talk.
Cité Universitaire, Fondation des Etats-Unis, “Grand Salon”, 15 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
http://www.ciup.fr/fondation-etats-unis/

 

5 p.m.-6.15 p.m. Keynote lecture
Chair: Allan Potofsky, Université Paris Diderot

  • Daniel K. Richter, McNeil Center for Early American Studies, University of Pennsylvania“Space and Power in England’s Restoration Atlantic Empire.”

 

 6.15 p.m.-8 p.m. – Reception

 

Saturday December 10, 2016
Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle
5, rue de l’école de médecine, 75006 Paris

Maps and directions! (PDF)

8.30 a.m.-9 a.m. – Registration

 

9 a.m.-10.45 a.m. – First morning session

Grand Amphi
Building imperial spaces
Chair: Max Edling, King’s College, London

  • Arad Gigi (Florida State University), Building Empires: Constructing forts, space, and state in Martinique, 1664-1756
  • Mary Draper (University of Virginia), Creole Sensibilities, Metropolitan Oversight, and the Fortifications of the British Caribbean, c. 1650-1730
  • Jared Hardesty (Western Washington University), Builders of Empire: European Master Craftsmen and the Making of the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World
  • Benjamin Fagan (Auburn University), Bounded Revolution: Geographies and Spaces of Black Resistance in John Gabriel Stedman’s Surinam

 Petit Amphi
Refusing Enslavement
Chair: Marie-Jeanne Rossignol, Université Paris

  • Marisa Fuentes (Rutgers-State University of New Jersey), The History of “Refuse Slaves” and the Spatialization of Death in Atlantic Port Cities in the Late Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
  • Greg O’Malley (University of California, Santa Cruz), The Escapes of David George: Using Flight to Negotiate Ameliorations Under Slavery in Colonial British America
  • Terri L. Snyder (California State University, Fullerton), Slavery, Antislavery, and Mobility in Early National District of Columbia: A Biographical Perspective
  • Randy Sparks (Tulane) The Micro-Diplomacy of the Illegal Slave Trade: The Case of William Houston

Room 33
Narratives of Others
Chair: Oliver Scheiding, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

  • Monica Dominguez Torres (University of Delaware), Of Looted Treasures and Stolen Images: Depictions of the Pearl Trade in the Spanish Atlantic
  • Edward Larkin (University of Delaware), Early American Imperial Temporalities
  • Bethel Saler (Haverford College), “This damn’d Barbary business”: Islamic North African Regencies and the Fantastical Project of the Early American Republic
  • Lydia ten Brummelhuis (University of Groningen), James Grainger’s The Sugar-Cane (1764) and Agricultural Warfare in Early America

 Room 12
Circulating politics
Chair: Evelyne Payen, Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle

  • Astrid Fellner (Universität des Saarlandes), Woman Defamed and Woman Defended: The Mobility of the Querelle des Femmes in the Atlantic World
  • John Funchion (University of Miami), Radical Correspondences: Transatlantic Writing against the Law in London, Paris, and the United States in the Late Eighteenth Century
  • Steven Sarson (Université Jean Moulin-Lyon 3), “To resume their original liberty”: The Glorious Revolution and the Contested Sources of Sovereignty and Power in the Anglo-Atlantic World, 1689-1776
  • Allison Stagg (John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität), The Movement of Visual Satire: a case study on the circulation of popular political caricatures in the early Republic

10.45 a.m.- 11.15 a.m. – Break

 

11.15 a.m.-1 p.m. – Second morning session

Grand Amphi
Power and Empire
Chair: Trevor Burnard, University of Melbourne

  • Alyssa Reichardt (Yale), The Limits of Empire: French and British Geographic Knowledge and Proposals for a North American Neutral Zone, 1754-1756
  • Eliga Gould (University of New Hampshire), War in a Time of Peace: European Treaty-Making and the Scramble for America, 1713-1763
  • Patrick Griffin (University of Notre Dame), Painting Empire: British Provincials and Imagining Empire after 1763
  • Peter Thompson (Oxford), Empires of Liberty, Empires of Power in Haiti and the United States

Petit Amphi
Native agencies
Chair: Daniel K. Richter, McNeil Center for Early American Studies, University of Pennsylvania

  • Heather Kopelson (University of Alabama), Circulating Incomprehension: Sights and Sounds of Wondrous Bodies in Early Modern European Accounts of the Americas
  • Augustin Habran (Université Paris Diderot), The Antebellum Indian Territory: A Southern Native “colony” in the West? (1830-1850)
  • Kristofer Ray (Dartmouth College), Cherokees, Indigenous Mobility, and the British Empire in the Ohio Valley, 1715-1774
  • Rindfleisch (Marquette University), “The Owner of the Town Ground”: Escotchaby of Coweta and the Politics of Intimacy in the Native South, Imperial America, and the Atlantic World, 1740-1780

Room 33
Religions in flux
Chair: Auréliane Narvaez, Université Paris 4-Paris Sorbonne

  • Isabelle Sicard (Université Paris Diderot), Religious Disestablishment in Massachusetts: Overcoming Boston’s Denominational Hegemony in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth
  • Thomas Richards (McNeil Center/Temple University), Reincarnating the Atlantic World: New England Merchants and Missionaries on the Pacific, 1820-1846
  • Sharon E. Wood (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Mobility, Claims-Making, and Brotherhood: A Family Across the Color Line in the Early Nineteenth Century United States

 

1 p.m. – End of Conference


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *